One year ago I introduced the “muffin concept” in a small blog post, “how we do Quality at ThoughtWorks”. Ever since then I have been to various Meetups and Conferences to discuss the idea and all the concepts behind it. After another year and dozens of discussion, there are more thoughts around how to bake quality in. It covers quite different aspects, thus I decided to split this post into a miniseries of 5 posts.

Enjoy the read and please give me feedback: tell me what you think!


People say that quality is like the chocolate on a muffin. Is it? Let’s say the product we build was indeed a muffin. The business analyst brought the recipes, and the developers baked it. Afterwards, the testers put chocolate on top.

If I imagine the muffin, it’s still a bit dull. The muffin is only perceived to be of really high quality if there are some chocolate chunks on top: like testing software.

The only problem is that – just like testing in the software delivery process – the chocolate is only “applied” after baking the major part of the product. It looks good and smells good. But does a muffin with a very few chocolate chunks only on top really taste better?

No, because there is no chocolate inside the muffin, just like testing does not improve the quality of a software:

When you test software you basically analyse a (hopefully) isolated system in a controlled environment. And no matter what you do, that system does not change. You may find behaviours in the system that are unexpected (which are the bugs / defects we are trying to find). But they were in the system already (before you started your test case) and they will be in there afterwards. No system under test does ever change its state (exception: quantum mechanics). Thus, the system does not evolve or improve (in quality) while you test it. Yet, another cycle of development in necessary to actually improve quality.

But that is quite sad. I am a quality analyst. An enthusiast. Caring about the quality of my product is my job description. Usually I am the team member most passionate about it. How can I be the only one who is not able to actually improve the quality?

With this mini-series of blog posts we want to investigate how we can be involved to improve quality in software early on – how to bake chocolate into the muffin!

Usually, a typical day in the life of a tester may look like this, where you pick a new build, deploy it to a test server, run smoke test and your extensive test suite. Possibly its (partly) automated. When no blockers are found one would monitor the production environment, ensure everything is healthy and announce & ship the build to production. Maybe you have a test suite running in production to ensure your delivery there:

However, that is only the last bit of a longer process. Normal, agile software delivery teams have a process that looks similar to the following one:

Each column is often reflected in tools like Mingle, Trello or Jira: “in analysis” is the step where Product Managers or Business Analysts work out the requirements for the projects. Once they are done they move into the next column. That could be a planning meeting where a sprint backlog is filled. We call the backlog “Ready for Dev” column. At some point devs pick up a story, works on it, finish it and put it into “Ready for QA” until a QA picks it up, works on it and ships it. Then a story is finally done.

If a defect is found in the QA work in the best case the ticket needs to go back to the devs or all the way back to in analysis. With these long feedback loops it can take a while until all kinks are out of a new piece of functionality.

Here we want to tighten the feedback loop and get involved earlier. Here is exactly the point where we can improve quality early on and where we can measure it. We identified four different fields where we are usually involved and where we have an actual impact on the quality of our product. You can read about each one of them in an individual (small) post:

  1. How changes to your process increase the quality of your product. (2 min)
  2. How to get involved earlier in the software development life cycle: be involved! (3 min)
  3. Joint forces of the analysts: improving the quality of software even before its built. (1min)
  4. How establishing a trustful error culture in your team gives you the final boost in quality. (2 min)

Those four points is our recipe to bake quality in: You add some chocolate early on by process improvements. Then we add some technical strawberries along with the right amount of cream in the business space. We finish it off with some colourful sugar toppings in the team culture and voila… we really bake quality in!

Background Image Source: i.pinimg.com

With this holistic approach, we also step beyond being pure “Quality Analysts”. We still analyze the quality of software. But we also specialize on so many more things that lead to a better product. Thus, we truly are Product Quality Specialists.